2022 Music Ecosystem Forum

EVENT DETAILS

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2022
GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Music Ecosystem Forum

speakers

ARTIST KEYNOTE: Santigold
POLICY KEYNOTE: King County (WA) Executive Dow Constantine

  • Aaron Myers, Singer/Activist, Washington, DC
  • Aram Sinnreich, Professor, School of Communication, American University, Washington, DC
  • Ashlye Keaton, Co-Founder, The Ella Project, New Orleans, LA
  • Ben Harbert, Associate Professor of Music, Georgetown University
  • Bill Johnson, WRTI
  • Chris Naoum, Listen Local First, Washington, DC
  • Dani Grant, Owner, Mishawaka Amphitheatre and Chipper's Lanes, Fort Collins, CO
  • Dayna Frank, President and CEO, First Avenue Productions, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN
  • Don Pitts, Sound Music Cities, Manchaca, TX
  • Dow Constantine, King County Executive, King County, Seattle
  • Dunia Best, Out of Our Shells, Washington DC
  • Eric Gilbert, Treefort Music Fest, Boise, ID
  • Hans Larson, Campfire, Washington DC
  • Jami Duffy, Youth on Record, Denver, CO
  • Kate Becker, Creative Economy & Recovery Director, King County, Seattle

  • Kevin Erickson, Future of Music Coalition, Washington, DC
  • Lisa Gedgaudas, Denver Arts and Venues, Denver, CO
  • Lynn Ross, PAL Vancouver
  • Mark Davyd, Founder & CEO, Music Venue Trust, London, UK
  • Meghan Chapple, Vice President of Sustainability, Georgetown University
  • Michael Bracy, Music Policy Forum, Washington, DC
  • Michael Seman, Assistant Professor of Arts Management, Colorado State University
  • Michael Silvers, Associate Professor of Musicology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Serafin Sanchez, Youth on Record, Denver, CO
  • Steve Waksman, Elsie Irwin Sweeney Professor of Music and Professor of American Studies, Smith College, Northampton, MA
  • Tef Poe, Rapper, Musician, and Activist, St. Louis/Boston
  • Teremoana Rapley, Sovereign Storyteller, Auckland
  • Tonya Dyson, Executive Director, Memphis Slim Collaboratory, Memphis, TN
  • Umi Hsu, Public Humanist and Digital Strategist, Los Angeles

Event Lineup

All times and agenda items are subject to change. Times listed are Eastern/local times for Washington, DC.

9:00-9:30 AM - INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC ECOSYSTEM FORUM

9:30-10:45 AM - MUSIC WORK, ITS HISTORY AND FUTURE

The Past and Future of Musical Labor, co-sponsored by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor

Since the start, workers in the music industry have been subject to precarious, speculative, and unpaid labor. The once romantic image of the “starving artist” is, in fact, a product of laws, racial inequities, technologies, and economic structures. The pandemic not only exacerbated the challenging conditions of musical labor, but also revealed the financial insecurity throughout the sector, the increasing stresses of touring, and the emotional toll of churning out artistic products. To envision a sustainable future of musical labor, we bring together artists, historians, and organizers to see how musical labor got to this point and identify where we may have some leverage at affecting real change.  

11:20 AM-12:30 PM - MUSIC POLICY FORUM LIVE….LIVE!

During the pandemic, Music Policy Forum Live became a virtual space where music stakeholders across the world could share information, strategies, resources and challenges in front of a live audience. Over a period of two years, MPF Live featured over 100 guests and reached thousands of participants live and via the program archive. For many, the program became an important piece of their weekly routine.

For the first time, host Michael Bracy is able to offer MPF Live in front of a live and virtual audience. Through a series of short interviews, Michael and co-host/MPF Board Member Ashlye Keaton will explore the theme of “My Big Idea” -- the one initiative, policy proposal, or strategy that can contribute to our shared goal of building stronger, more equitable and more resilient music ecosystems. This program will coincide with the release of a collection of essays from MPF colleagues and friends reflecting on lessons from the past three years and what we need to do to move forward with vision, clarity and bravery.

12:30-1:00 PM - LUNCH

1:00-2:00 PM - KEYNOTE

2:00-3:15 PM - CONFLUENCE AND COLLISION: AT THE INTERSECTION OF PERFORMANCE AND POLICY PRACTICES

Artists and policy makers are often perceived, even positioned, to operate in opposition. Current assessment indicates there are an increasing number of members of the civil service who possess deep knowledge of many facets of music, and a corresponding group of musicians and sound practitioners who understand the need for effective, informed policy. Interrogating overlaps and ruptures between musical practice, sound art practice, and governing practice, this panel addresses the productive tension between grassroots action and large-scale policy initiatives. How, in other words, can musicians, sound artists and policy makers learn from one another?

3:30-4:45 PM - MUSIC & SUSTAINABILITY: A PORTRAIT OF THE CLIMATE + ECOLOGICAL CRISIS IN PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS

co-sponsored by the Earth Commons—Georgetown University's Institute for Environment & Sustainability

Facilitated by Georgetown’ University’s Vice President of Sustainability Meghan Chapple, this discussion will explore how individuals, communities and institutions are experiencing and responding to the climate and ecological crisis in their art, operations, and culture. The conversation will explore the influence of climate change and habitat destruction, and global impacts on artistic performance, from small venues and the COVID-19 pandemic, to large festivals and extreme weather, to the context of indigenous communities whose music is vulnerable to effects of climate change. The conversation will look ahead to define what resources are needed to keep musical communities vibrant and resilient in the midst of global change.  

5:00-6:15 PM - DON’T REBUILD, RE-IMAGINE

The pandemic reinforced what music stakeholders already knew – the music ecosystem is a delicate network of interconnected organizations that dictate how we record, distribute and access music. When the ecosystem is aligned, great things can happen for musicians and audiences. When there is mis-alignment…we all fail to capture music’s essential value to community and humanity.

The pandemic forced us all to question our assumptions, innovate on the fly, reflect deeply on the role of music in society and assess what we can do as stakeholders to ensure the health and vitality of the music community. In this session, music champions reflect on what it means to truly capture this moment. From venues to compensation; housing to wellness how can we push our sector forward with fearlessness and collaboration?

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